(via waxjism)

stitch-please:

theresnoplacelikeoz:

For my current project, I need to switch from a 16” needle to a larger one. Stumbled upon this and thought I shoud share it.
I would love to say where this came from but the site I found it on had not credited anyone.

Sheep gods bless this holy table

stitch-please:

theresnoplacelikeoz:

For my current project, I need to switch from a 16” needle to a larger one.
Stumbled upon this and thought I shoud share it.

I would love to say where this came from but the site I found it on had not credited anyone.

Sheep gods bless this holy table

(via foolishrabbit)

k8monster:

March socks!

k8monster:

March socks!

allidrummer:

The constant struggle.

allidrummer:

The constant struggle.

(via ifshehadwings)

lightsharpnesssong:

Knitting Inspiration: hoods. Like, fairy tale hoods. I read somewhere that “capes are in” this year and, while I don’t give a flying fuck about that sort of thing, it does mean that suddenly all these fetching hooded capelet/shawl things are sprouting like mushrooms. (Get it? Mushrooms? Fairy rings….fairy tales? You’re right, that was a bit of a stretch.)

I’m particularly drawn to ones that are heavily textured or almost insubstantial. There was a thing with hooded scarves a few years back that I never really committed to; having seen these more voluminous alternatives, I suddenly understand why I waited. Unlike hoodies, which are ubiquitously casual to the point where I refuse to wear them, and hooded scarves, which make me think of kids who can’t be trusted to not lose individual cold weather items and are thus given a combination mittens/hood/scarf thing, these are poised somewhere between little kid make-believe and massive sophistication. I also suspect that they won’t cause hat hair, although I might have to line them to prevent unfortunate bobby pin accidents.

Sources are, as always, in the captions.

(via ifshehadwings)

jumpingjacktrash:

monthofmay:

Redditor’s wife knitted a beautiful star chart shawl.

this is the pattern i just reblogged the ravelry link to, except they apparently left out the yarnover eyelets, and i think i like it better.

(via tsukinofaerii)

katydidnot:

the conclusion you should get from the boyfriend sweater curse is that you should not waste your craft on boys

asker

darlinglisa asked: Every sweater pattern I find annoys me at some point and I'm driving myself crazy trying to figure out how to Frankenstein them all together to get something I like. I remember you mentioned a book you used when you were making that raspberry colored sweater, but I can't remember the name of it to save my life? Help? :D

k8monster:

Hellooooo!! I have two, actually. There’s Sweater Design in Plain English by Maggie Righetti and then there’s the Sweater Workshop by Jacqueline Fee.

The first is more like an in-depth theory course. From Maggie, I learned how sweaters are constructed and how they work. There are sections on fit and sizing, types of sleeves, etc. It’s a good read, especially if you’re a knitting construction nerd, like me, but it’s a READ, rather than like, a step-by-step sort of thing that you do with your knitting in HAND.

For THAT, I have the Sweater Workshop. This book is set up very much like a beginner’s sweater knitting class. There’s a sampler at the beginning, which ends up looking like a really weird fish, but has you practice all the techniques you need for ANY sweater basically ever. But you don’t have to make one, I didn’t. I just jumped in and made a bottom-up, seamless sweater from the instructions. And it is a step-by-step, knit-a-long sort of instruction manual. 

As far as I’m concerned, both of these books are invaluable to me, sweaters being one of my favorite things to knit and wear. They are worth every penny that I paid for them which wasn’t that much, really. At the same time that I bought those books, I also bought the Knitter’s Handy Book of Top-Down Sweaters by Ann Budd, but I haven’t even used it yet, because the other two have been so useful. Taking a bit of a peek at it now, it looks very similar to the Sweater Workshop, except these sweaters are all knit top-down rather than bottom-up, and hey, it looks like the math is done for you, whereas with the Workshop you have to do a little multiplying and things like that. It seems to assume a more knowledgable reader, though, and it doesn’t look like it’s quite as clear on HOW to do some things.

I hope that was helpful! If it says anything about these books, I’ve now made about ten sweaters in three years, only two of which were from a pattern. One of those doesn’t fit me quite right and the other was a gift. Eight of them I designed myself, and I’m happy with all of them.

waxjism:

I’m no lady and my stash is HUGE. 

damngruchy:

supermassiveasshole:

i was teaching my grandma to use computer so we can talk on skype and such but today she went kinda mad at me because “i didnt show her the knitting programme” and i was like what

and it comes out she accidentally opened ms excel and found out its a great way to create knitting patterns

image

my grandma is 82

image

(via fleete)